Pro-Trump organizer agrees to cooperate with DOJ in Jan.  6 probes

Pro-Trump organizer agrees to cooperate with DOJ in Jan. 6 probes

Pro-Trump organizer Ali Alexander confirmed Friday that he is cooperating with the Justice Department’s investigation of the Jan. 6 uprising, Political reports.

Why it matters: Alexander, who was connected to permit applications for the “Stop the Steal” rally that preceded the Capitol attack, claimed to have been in communication with the White House and Congress members about events planned to coincide with the certification of the 2020 election, according to the Jan. 6 select committee, which subpoenaed him in October.

  • Leading up to Jan. 6, Alexander “made repeated reference during Stop-the-Steal-sponsored events to the possible use of violence to achieve the organization’s goals,” the select committee said in an October release.

What he’s saying: Alexander said in a statement Friday, per Politico, that a federal grand jury recently subpoenaed him for information on several groups of people linked to pro-Trump rallies in DC after the 2020 election, including “Women for America First” and the “Save America March.”

  • He denied talking with the White House about security groups or coordinating plans with the Proud Boys. “I don’t believe I have information that will be useful to them but I’m cooperating as best as I can,” he said.
  • “I did nothing wrong and I am not in possession of evidence that anyone else had plans to commit unlawful acts,” he added.
  • “I denounce anyone who planned to subvert my permitted event and the other permitted events of that day on Capitol grounds to stage any counterproductive activities.”

The big picture: Alexander’s cooperation could offer insight into the White House officials and lawmakers who may have been involved in the attempt to block the certification of President Biden’s win.

  • The subpoena delivered to him is an “indication that the inquiry could reach into the Trump administration and its allies in Congress,” the New York Times notes.
  • Alexander voluntarily sat for a deposition with the House committee in December and handed over documents related to its investigation.

Editor’s note: This story has been updated with Alexander’s statement.

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